The Death Of Me
anexperimentallife:

One of the women who organized the dance first complained about Claire’s dress, but upon checking, admitted that it conformed to the standards set for the event. Nonetheless, the same woman later pulled Claire aside and told her that some of the dads—who had been watching from a balcony—felt her dancing was “too provocative” and liable to cause “impure thoughts.”
When Claire pointed out that she hadn’t even been dancing, other chaperones joined in, again told her that her dress was too short (despite having verified it was within standards, and despite other girls having shorter dresses), and, finally kicked her out of the dance.
What made Claire so provocative that these men couldn’t control themselves? Well, apparently the fact that she’s 5’9, with long legs, and built more like a grown woman than like a typical teenager. That’s it.
The problem isn’t that these men found her to be attractive; the problem is  that they and others—including other women—held Claire responsible for the men’s unwillingness to control their own reactions.
The message here is that if a man has difficulty controlling himself around a woman he finds attractive, it’s the woman’s fault for being too “provocative.”
Let me emphasize that point for those who still don’t get it: Women are held accountable for men’s reactions. This is why when a woman reports a rape, or sexual harassment of any kind, among the first questions asked—by both men and women—is inevitably, “what was she wearing?” And unless she was covered head to toe, there are inevitably comments like, “Well, what did she expect?” Even if the woman was wearing baggy sweatpants and a sweater three sizes too big, there are far too many who’s first response is, “Well, she must have done something.”
And this, my friends, is rape culture.
Read the Gawker story here, and Claire’s blog post here.

anexperimentallife:

One of the women who organized the dance first complained about Claire’s dress, but upon checking, admitted that it conformed to the standards set for the event. Nonetheless, the same woman later pulled Claire aside and told her that some of the dads—who had been watching from a balcony—felt her dancing was “too provocative” and liable to cause “impure thoughts.”

When Claire pointed out that she hadn’t even been dancing, other chaperones joined in, again told her that her dress was too short (despite having verified it was within standards, and despite other girls having shorter dresses), and, finally kicked her out of the dance.

What made Claire so provocative that these men couldn’t control themselves? Well, apparently the fact that she’s 5’9, with long legs, and built more like a grown woman than like a typical teenager. That’s it.

The problem isn’t that these men found her to be attractive; the problem is  that they and others—including other women—held Claire responsible for the men’s unwillingness to control their own reactions.

The message here is that if a man has difficulty controlling himself around a woman he finds attractive, it’s the woman’s fault for being too “provocative.”

Let me emphasize that point for those who still don’t get it: Women are held accountable for men’s reactions. This is why when a woman reports a rape, or sexual harassment of any kind, among the first questions asked—by both men and women—is inevitably, “what was she wearing?” And unless she was covered head to toe, there are inevitably comments like, “Well, what did she expect?” Even if the woman was wearing baggy sweatpants and a sweater three sizes too big, there are far too many who’s first response is, “Well, she must have done something.”

And this, my friends, is rape culture.

Read the Gawker story here, and Claire’s blog post here.

foodffs:

Garlic Scape Pesto and Fresh Mozzarella Grilled Cheese
Really nice recipes. Every hour.

this is important

this is important

supamuthafuckinvillain:

cosplay-gamers:

Frank Ippolito and Tested have teamed up to create this lifelike replica of Zoidberg from Futurama!

Watch the Making of Zoidberg

This is terrifying

bigpaynos:

g-asp:

White girls

what the fuck are you talking about “white girls” she’s 100% right take your misogynistic bullshit out of here

bigpaynos:

g-asp:

White girls

what the fuck are you talking about “white girls” she’s 100% right take your misogynistic bullshit out of here

lifehackable:

More Coffee Hacks Here

ultrafacts:

Want More facts? Follow the Ultrafacts Blog

discobirdmilf:

new godzilla movie ending

discobirdmilf:

new godzilla movie ending

thefrogman:

Sometimes it takes a few times for Otis to learn from his mistakes. 

This was last week’s Corg Life. 

CHECK OUT AN ALL NEW CORG LIFE HERE!

fullofstoryshapes:

Miles McMillan for EDUN's Birds of Prey Campaign F/W 2012 filmed by Ryan McGinley.

ten-and-donna:

kissnecks:

THIS OKAY

You want to get kids out of foster care and into good, loving homes? I’ve got a simple solution to your problem.

ten-and-donna:

kissnecks:

THIS OKAY

You want to get kids out of foster care and into good, loving homes? I’ve got a simple solution to your problem.

the-winter-solider:

britt-is-fit:

thebachelorsparty:

BEST 3:48 MIN EVER

"You are the biggest mistake of my fucking life"

I’M DYING

THIS IS AMAZING

maleficuntessa:

baldymonster:

cleolinda:

killjoyfeminist:

annabellioncourt:

plz-no:

Simultaneously the worst and best movie ever made

Actually one of my teachers watched every single version of Romeo and Juliet with the original text in front of him to prove that this was the worst version, but to his great dismay its the most accurate film adaptation of it, with the lines closest to the original text and most similar stage direction and relayed emotions.

He proceeded to show it to us in class.

Dude, seriously.  This version is actually very accurate.

My Shakespeare professor in grad school said the same thing.

I think most Shakespeare movies are just so classy and highbrow with their gorgeous period costumes and mandatory snooty elocutionary accents that people forget how goofy this play actually is. The lines, the characters, the motivations, the babyfaced teen stars, I just… oh my god it’s all so real. I’ve heard a lot of people blast Baz Luhrmann for making such a campy adaptation and it’s just like no, you don’t understand, that was all Shakespeare.

Sometimes I wonder if the real reason it’s disliked is because it was so damn popular with teenage girls.

I’ve tried actually tried watching several adaptations of Romeo and Juliet and I cannot stand them for the life of me. Firstly, while they’re pretty to look at, I always end up bored to tears or asleep. Baz Luhrmann’s version made the story relevant again and was full of overwhelming emotions that the other adaptations seem to lack. Going through the lines only tells the story, but I feel like his Romeo + Juliet really brought it to life.

aviculor:

bonitabreezy:

buzzfeed:

You might want to get that translated before you actually get the tattoo. 

My uncle has kanji on the back of his leg that means orange chicken.

The Girl With The Noodle Tattoo